Should You Be Taking Skin Boosting Supplements?

Unsure whether you may need an extra nutritional boost for your skin? OR are you perhaps lacking in a vital skin nutrient without realising 😳?

Our skin is often a reflection of what is going on inside our bodies. It’s always best to aim to get the majority of your nutrition through your food. HOWEVER, if you don’t always eat as well as you should ….here are 7 supplements to consider

Skin Boosting Supplements

Vitamin A (Retinol)

Vitamin A is an antioxidant that belongs to the class of compounds called retinoids. It is critical for skin maintenance and repair, collagen production and acne prevention.

F9BB7C22-1C20-4892-9FCB-AE360A838526.jpegLow levels of Vitamin A have been associated with:-

  • Rough, dry and scaling skin.
  • Inflammatory skin conditions.
  • Follicular thickening of the skin – which can show up as rough, raised bumps on the back of the arms (called hyperkeratosis pillaris).
  • Acne – Vitamin A is essential for the normal shedding of dead skin cells which can otherwise build up inside our pores. As we know, blocked pores ultimately lead to acne. Furthermore, Vitamin A has anti-inflammatory benefits for our skin and can therefore help calm angry acne breakouts.

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Vitamin A is found in two different forms: Active Vitamin A and Beta Carotene. Active Vitamin A comes from animal-derived foods and is otherwise known as retinol. This ‘ready to be absorbed’ Vitamin A can be used straight away by the body -it does not need to be converted. The 2nd type of Vitamin A (which is obtained from colourful fruits and vegetables), is ‘Beta Carotene’. These carotenoids need to be converted to the active form of Vitamin A by the body (after the food is ingested). Beta carotene is found primarily in vegetables and fruits.

The most vitamin A-rich foods are liver and cod liver oil, however other sources include:-

Eggs, asparagus, peaches, carrots, beet greens, kale, broccoli, spinach, sweet potato, cantaloupe, red peppers and mango.

Poor Gut Health can cause malabsorption of vitamin A.

Vitamin A (commonly known as Retin-A) has been prescribed for decades by dermatologists to treat acne ‘topically’. Accutane (Roacutane) is a prescription oral medication which is derived from vitamin A. It has been used to treat severe cases of acne by dermatologists for years. However it can have serious side effects and its use must be supervised by a dermatologist.

Note:- Because Vitamin A is fat-soluble, it can build up in our body. Therefore an excessive intake (of more than 10,000 international units / IU) can be toxic. This is especially the case during pregnancy, so women who are planning on becoming pregnant should check with their doctors before starting any supplements.

B7 / Biotin

Vitamin B7, otherwise known as ‘Biotin’ is a water-soluble ‘B-complex’ vitamin.

B7 (biotin) contributes to the maintenance of strong and healthy hair, SKIN, nails, mucous membranes, the nervous system, and psychological functions. It is also essential for the metabolism of glucose, proteins and fatty acids.

Interestingly B7 sometimes gets the nickname ‘Vitamin H’, which stems from the German word “Haar” which mean “hair and skin.”

The human body cannot synthesis its own Vitamin B7. Only bacteria, molds, yeasts, algae, and certain plants can make it. SO it needs to be supplied via our diet.

Unabsorbed B7 is eliminated in urine, so the body does not build up spare reserves. This means it must be consumed daily.

Sources of B7 include:-

Salmon, sardines, avocado, bananas, raspberries, liver, mushrooms, yeast, whole-wheat bread, cheddar cheese, pork, chicken, cauliflower, egg yolk, carrots, dairy, certain nuts.

Although B7 deficiency is not too common, the symptoms include:
• dry, irritated skin
• brittle hair or hair loss

Vitamin C

The antioxidant properties of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid), combined with its role in connective tissue health and the synthesis of collagen -makes Vitamin C vital for SKIN health.

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, which our body does not make on its own (and it does not store it either). SO it is important that it is included daily in our diet.

Many fruits and vegetables are great sources of vitamin C. Some good ones include:-

Citrus fruits, strawberries, broccoli, spinach, kale, red capsicum (pepper), kiwi fruit, guava, papaya.

A deficiency in Vitamin C can present as:

  • Rough, dry, scaly skin
  • Easy bruising
  • Slow wound healing
  • Dry and splitting hair
  • Dry red spots on the skin
  • Poor gum health (bleeding, inflammation etc)

Essential Fatty Acids – particularly Omega-3’s

Essential fatty acids (EFAs) have many health benefits including SKIN health. This is due to the fatty acids EPA & DHA.

  • Help keep the skin moist and strong by reducing the amount of water lost through the epidermis (the top layer of skin).
  • Has anti-inflammatory properties – including the treatment of eczema, rosacea, psoriasis and acne.
  • Help prevent premature aging of our skin.
  • Mental Health benefits (eg anxiety & depression).
  • Heart Health
  • Helps with the management of ADHD.

Inflammation is a big part of the problem with acne (externally and systemically). Therefore an anti-inflammatory Omega-3 supplement is helpful when it comes to clearing acne.

Since the body doesn’t produce EFA’s, they must be obtained through our diet or from supplements. Good dietary sources include salmon, sardines, walnuts and flaxseeds.

Good EFA supplements include Fish oil, Sea Buckthorn & Krill oil. However keep in mind that there are fish oils and there are fish oils. SO many of the supplements found in our supermarkets are manufactured cheaply and can even be rancid! Choose a reputable company (eg BioCeuticals in Australia) where the fish oil undergoes strict testing to ensure its purity & to make sure it is of the highest quality, using ethically sourced fish free of heavy metals.

Zinc

Zinc is an vital mineral that helps with;-

  • Healthy skin, hair & nails
  • Prevention and management of acne & other skin conditions.
  • Healthy immune function.
  • Tissue repair and wound healing.
  • The metabolism of omega-3 fatty acids

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Zinc is easlier absorbed from animal food sources. However some plant foods and nuts can be high in zinc as well. Good sources include: Organs such as kidney and liver, red meat such as beef and lamb, and seafood such as oysters, scallops, and other shellfish. Non animal sources include pecans, pumpkin seeds, ginger, legumes, mushrooms and whole grains.

Probiotics

See previous article…

Curcumin

Turmeric is a bright yellow-orange spice related to ginger. Turmeric gets its health benefits primarily because of its bioactive component ‘curcumin’.

Curcumin – is an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral powerhouse.

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Curcumin has been shown to be quite effective in calming the symptoms of eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, scleroderma, rosacea, and other skin diseases. Although the underlying causes of these conditions vary, they all have ‘inflammation’ of the skin in common.

Science shows that Curcumin can be beneficial for acne sufferers. Topically applied it can kill bacteria and reduce acne-causing inflammation. Taken internally it can reduce inflammation which partially the cause of acne. In fact, studies have shown that acne sufferers have higher levels of inflammation and lower levels of antioxidants than people with clear skin. Therefore it is no surprise that treatments that reduce inflammation and oxidative stress reduce acne.

More recently, studies have suggested that curcumin, may slow (or even cease) the growth of melanoma skin cancer cells.

 

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse) 🙂

 

Please note:-
The recommended daily amount of vitamin A (from all sources) is 700mcg retinol equivalents for women and 900mcg retinol equivalents for men. If you are pregnant, or considering becoming pregnant, do not take vitamin A supplements without consulting your doctor or pharmacist. WARNING – When taken in excess of 3000mcg retinol equivalents, vitamin A can cause harm to the baby.

Psychodermatogy – The Mind-Skin Connection

Our mind and skin are very much connected. This is now being referred to as Psychodermatogy. Psychological stressors such as chronic depression, stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been known to increase flare ups of acne, rosacea, psoriasis, hives, eczema and vitiligo (depigmented white spots on the skin).

According to Shelley Sekula-Gibbs (MD Professor of Dermatology), studies show that “at least 30% of all dermatology patients have some underlying psychological problem that often goes unaddressed”.

Constant stress increases the production of our stress hormone ‘cortisol’. This then triggers inflammation and can also throw off other hormones in our body.  Increased inflammation is not good news for inflammatory skin disorders.

Stress can also disrupt the balance between the good and bad bacteria in our gut. As we know, our gut health can also cause havoc with our skin. See Gut Article

When cortisol levels backfire, it can lead to over activity of oil glands in our skin. The sebaceous glands on the face and neck produce excess sebum, and our pores are more likely to become blocked. Bacteria loves to harvest in these blocked pores, which causes pimples.

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Anxiety & other Psychological Conditions can also make it harder to sleep. Studies have shown that sleeplessness seems to have an effect on our skin’s ability to heal. This can then negatively effect skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, acne etc.

 What else we know about Stress (and other Negative Emotions)

  • When we are anxious or stressed, it becomes much harder to ignore negative sensations, like itching caused by eczema and psoriasis.
  • For psoriasis sufferers –  the immune system really over-responds to stress hormones— which can lead to major flare-ups.
  • Stress hormones also trigger our body’s “fight or flight” response. Blood, oxygen and nutrients are directed to vital areas such as our muscles so that they are ready for action. This means that our non-vital areas such as our SKIN miss out.
  • Cortisol inhibits our bodies repair and healing process. This is not ideal for flare-ups of any inflammatory skin conditions.

 

The Viscous Cycle

Flare-ups of Skin Conditions such as acne and psoriasis can then cause a person to experience more stress, continuing the cycle.

What Can Help

Finding ways to cope with underlying psychological issues (such as stress) can have a very positive impact on improving skin conditions.

  • hypnosis is an option for some people
  • meditation
  • exercise
  • Get more sleep
  • deep breathing exercises
  • seek help from a professional
  • some people fin essential oils useful
  • psychotherapy
  • yoga

 

Exercise Skin Benefits

A Great Read 

first, we make the beast beautiful’ by Sarah Wilson

For more information visit

https://www.psoriasis.org/life-with-psoriasis/stress

https://www.webmd.com/beauty/features/effects-of-stress-on-your-skin#1

Common Skin Conditions – What to avoid & what can help.

Four Common Skin Conditions

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Rosacea
An Inflammatory disorder causing redness and sometimes small pimples on the face. The small surface blood vessels (capillaries) enlarge, giving the appearance of a flushed face.
The exact cause is not 100% known. However avoiding the ten below things can help manage the symptoms.
Specific triggers to avoid include stress, high temperatures (including hot baths & saunas), spicy foods, alcohol, some cosmetics, sun exposure, hot drinks and food.

Acne
Obstruction and inflammation of sebaceous glands which leads to infection.
Common triggers include hormonal changes during puberty, pregnancy, perimenopause + fluctuations during (certain days) of the menstrual cycle.                                …..See previous adult acne article.

Eczema
Chronic immune-mediated inflammation of the skin involving genetic and environmental factors.
Specific triggers include stress, exposure to allergens (such as dust mite, foods & cosmetics), and dry air.
Linked to asthma and allergic rhinitis.

Psoriasis
A chronic systemic inflammatory disorder. It occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks normal tissues in the body. Skin cells build up and form scales and itchy dry patches. Triggers can include stress, infections, medications, sunburn, poor gut health.

10 common causes of these skin conditions

  1. Nutritional deficiencies
  2. Hormonal imbalances
  3. Poor gut health including intestinal dyobiosis
  4. Stress
  5. Thyroid problems
  6. Immune system abnormalities
  7. Infection (bacterial, parasitic or viral)
  8. Medications
  9. Poor hygiene
  10. Allergies

 

Helpful Supplements

– when diet alone isn’t enough

Zinc
Is an absolutely essential micronutrient for the Skin. It helps with tissue growth & repair, inflammation and infection. Deficiency can present as rough or dry skin, dermatitis, skin lesions, an increase in skin infections and slow wound healing.

Vitamin A
Helps prevent skin infection (eg acne), helps with collagen production and wound healing. Vitamin A also has antioxidant properties , helping neutralize free radicals that cause tissue and cellular damage. Consult with your doctor before taking vitamin A supplements when pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

Vitamin C
Helps with tissue repair (including healing damaged skin), collagen synthesis, connective tissue, and the skins elasticity. A deficiency in vitamin C can lead to dry skin, increased bruising and impaired wound healing.

Essential fatty acids (Omega-3)
Helps with inflammation and wound healing.
Nourishes the Skin and helps prevent moisture loss. Deficiency contributes to eczema, psoriasis, sun spots, dandruff and also thinning hair. Oily fish like salmon, sardines, and tuna have fewer omega-3s than good quality capsules. Omega-3 supplements include Krill oil, Fish Oil or Sea buckthorn oil capsules.

Other Antioxidants (eg vitamin E, selenium, green tea, coenzyme Q10 etc)

Probiotics
Research has shown that the state of your gut has a great deal to do with the condition of your skin. Where there is gut inflammation, there is usually skin inflammation
See Gut Article

Turmeric

Curcumin is the active part of the turmeric plant. It is anti-inflammatory and can help with a wide variety of skin conditions. Curcumin has even been found to help clear mild psoriasis plaques, and prevent flare ups in some sufferers.

Silica
Is required to produce collagen and is a natural anti-inflammatory. Is good for Skin, hair and nails.

Other skin supplements include – echinacea, burdock, sea buckthorn (a vegetarian source of Omega fatty acids), yellow dock, cleavers etc.

Skin Treatments

See LED Light Therapy

Skincare

Soothe has been named as the favourite regimen by The Sydney Morning Herald & has recently been reviewed in Allure. This regimen uses RFp3 Peptite technology -A breakthrough combination of skin soothing peptides & skin detoxifying peptides working with a protease inhibitor at the skins surface to neutralise triggers & reduce visible signs of redness. If you suffer from sensitive, red or irritated skin …..this may be the product for you! It comes with a R+F 60 day money back guarantee. Please contact me to find out how to save 10% on this product and to receive free shipping. Or why not try the Solution Tool to get a personalised Skin Regime

https://visherwood.myrandf.com/au

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Some Supplement Recommendations-

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Note- We know Fish oil has many health benefits due to the essential fatty acids EPA & DHA (omega 3’s). However there are fish oils and there are fish oils. SO many of the ones found in our supermarkets are manufactured cheaply and can even be rancid! BioCeuticals fish oil undergoes strict testing to ensure its purity & to make sure it is of the highest quality, using ethically sourced fish free of heavy metals.

LEAVE YOUR SKIN CLEAR, ENERGISED & REJUVENATED – with LED Therapy

It can be lights, camera, action all year round with LED.

Non-invasive LED Light Therapy works at a cellular level. The soothing, deep penetrating LED lights target deep into cells heightening their internal functions, photo-stimulating dermal blood flow, and inducing faster healing so your skin always looks rejuvenated.

  • Increased blood circulation
  • Acne treatment
  • Rosacea reduction
  • Skin rejuvenation and improved skin texture
  • Lines and wrinkles
  • Wound healing
  • Pain relief
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Arthritis
  • Muscle spasm

 

LED Blue Light

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Specifically targets active acne.

  • Is clinically proven to reduce acne lesions by 70%.
  • Targets the acne bacteria and promotes the body’s own natural healing response to rejuvenate skin. SO your acne fades and your skin heals
  • Safe, effective, no down time.
  • Most skin types, all year round.

 

LED Yellow Light

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Penetrates deep in to the layers of the skin causing rejuvenation, cell repair and increased circulation.

  • Skin Rejuvenation
  • Wound Healing

Is also very effective after skin treatments (such as Dermal Rolling, Fractional RF, Peals and Cosmetic injections).

LED Light Therapy is pain free and in fact very relaxing. There is no down time and the treatment only takes approximately 15 minuets. SO they can easily be squeezed into your busy schedule.

LED Treatments are very affordable at Laser Clinics Australia.

http://www.laserclinics.com.au

 

 

Is your GUT effecting your Skin??

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More and more studies are linking our GUT health to our SKIN.

Our GUT does much more than purely absorbing nutrients and energy from our food. It also:-

  • Plays an important role in our immune system (about two thirds of our immune system lives in the gut).
  • Produces more than twenty four hormones that influence everything from our appetite to our mood and even our Skin.
  • Produces detoxifying enzymes (which also destroy harmful bacteria).

Probiotics are ‘goodbacteria that strengthen the lining of our gut, support our body’s ability to absorb nutrients and fight infection. Strengthening our gut lining is important, as this can help protect us from invaders such as bad bacteria, fungi and viruses. Having low levels of good bacteria allows these bad pathogens and toxins to leak out into the body (aka “leaky gut syndrome”). When our immune system detects these invaders, it overreacts by causing inflammation. This can then lead to inflammatory skin issues such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, dermatitis and rosacea.

Gut Skin Connection

Nutrients need to be absorbed correctly in the gut in order for growth, repair, and normal functioning to occur. When our gut is restricted (with the absorption of nutrients), it begins to prioritise which organs will get the few nutrients that are available. When nutrients are in short supply, the body priorities the essential organs like the heart, brain and liver. This results in our skin, hair and nails missing out.

SO for good gut health we need good gut flora. The bacteria should be varied and well balanced. Meaning …more of the good guys than the bad!

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So what can we do to help?

Probiotics

The best way to increase your levels of good bacteria is through food. Some good options include:-

  • Yoghurt – good old fashioned full fat natural yoghurt.
  • Feta – is rich in Lactobacillus & plantarum which have anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Fermented Foods – such as Saurkraut & Kimchi.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar.
  • Kefir – a fermented dairy drink rich in the beneficial probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus.
  • Miso – made from fermented soybeans, rice or barley.
  • Kombucha – an effervescent fermentation of black tea.

Supplementing with additional high quality probiotic supplements can be a great way to get more probiotics into your body. Taking a probiotic supplement can also naturally boost the good probiotics that are already in your system. Supplementation can be especially beneficial for sufferers of inflammatory skin problems like acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and dermatitis.

Prebiotics

Prebiotics are like fertilisers for your good gut flora. Examples include:-

  • Inulin found in onions, garlic, leeks, witlof, endive, Jerusalem artichokes, asparagus & bananas.
  • Fibre – such as flaxseeds, apples, oats.

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To avoid / limit

  • Sugar – bad bacteria feeds on sugar.
  • Artificial sweeteners – are now thought to harm the good bacteria in your gut.
  • Processed foods – are often loaded with sugar and gluten. They also often contain emulsifiers, which are added to a lot of processed foods to extend their shelf life ….and dramatically increase gut inflammation.
  • Unnecessary oral antibiotics – which can wipe out your beneficial, protective gut bacteria.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, which can cause intestinal and gut inflammation, damaging the lining and causing intestinal and gut permeability.
  • Stress – this connection is referred to as the gut-brain axis.
  • Alcohol – can irritate the stomach and intestines, cause inflammation and suppress certain vital hormone production.
  • Gluten – causes inflammation of the gut in most people.
  • Unfermented Dairy – can cause inflammation similar to gluten and sugar.

What else can help?

  • Exercise – researchers believe that exercise increases particular types of bacteria in the gut.
  • Sleep
  • Limiting stress (which decreases cortisol levels).
  • Bone broth – collagen is great for the gut and skin.

The importance of keeping things regular 

Our skin (which is our largest organ) is a major form of elimination for the body. If bowel motions aren’t regular, then toxins will need to be excreted elsewhere. 

As our face is covered in pores, it becomes the perfect back-up plan for excreting toxins. This can results in acne! SO, it’s really important to have regular bowel motions to ensure your body does not either store toxins or eliminate them via the skin. 

Good reads

  1. The Clever Guts Diet
    – Dr Michael Mosley
  2. GUT – The inside story of our body’s most under-rated organ. – Giulia Enders.

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology)

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