Rosacea – What to do and what not to do

Rosacea is an inflammatory condition. It is characterised by intense and frequent flushing or blotchy redness, with the appearance of ‘broken blood vessels’ on the cheeks, chin, and nose, and in most cases, acne-like pimples. It is often mistaken for adult acne, however it usually lacks the blackheads and true whiteheads (‘comedones’) of acne vulgaris. It is important to distinguish between the two as the treatments that work for acne are not good for rosacea.

We are not 100% sure of the exact cause, but we do know:-

  • It runs in families
  • Sufferers usually have sensitive skin
  • Hormones play a role
  • Certain infections can may play a role
  • Gut Health is often connected (see Gut-Skin) – there is in fact a a higher incidence of rosacea in people with SIBO (small intestinal bacteria overgrowth).
  • The regulation of blood flow to the skin in rosacea is abnormal.
  • Is most common in light skinned women between the ages of 30 to 50.
  • Many sufferers also have facial seborrhoea dermatitis. This can also be known as facial dandruff.

 

There are 4 different Subtypes of Rosacea

Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea
The inflammation is more diffused into the skin and is associated with redness and flushing. There is often episodes of flushing which occur due triggers (see triggers below).
Papulopustular Rosacea
The inflammation is heavily centred around the pore, causing pimple like redness and swelling. Sometimes pustules and nodules are present. Skin may be sebaceous and even oily in areas.
Glandular Rosacea
Is more commonly seen in men who had a history of teenage acne. It is typically around the nose area. Skin is thick and reddened, pores are large and can be filled with plugs of dead skin cells and sebum. There is usually enlargement and swelling of the oil glands on the nose which makes the nose look larger and rounded at the end.
Ocular Rosacea
The oil glands along the eyelash line. Ocular rosacea can be seen with the other types of rosacea.

Triggers

  • Spicy foods
  • Heat – including saunas and spas
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol– particularly Red wine
  • Stress, anxiety and embarrassment
  • Physical exertion
  • Cosmetic & skincare products that contain high levels of alcohol, glycolic acids or fragrance.
  • Hot drinks
  • Excessive physical exertion.
  • Due to the skins weakened barrier, certain skin treatments need to be avoided. This includes facial acid peels and microdermabrasion.

 

What else we know about all types of Rosacea

  • Demodex mites have been linked to rosacea in some studies. This microscopic mite likes to reside in hair follicles and have been shown to be more numerous in the skin of rosacea sufferers.
  • Intestinal bacteriah. pylori’ may play a role.
  • Sebaceous hyperplasia papules are often present. These are enlargements of the oil glands which look like small waxy yellow bumps and have a central pore. They are often mistaken for milia.

 

What can help

Although rosacea can not always be 100% cured, there are a variety of lifestyle changes and treatments that can help keep it under control.

  • See Kleresca
  • Topical agents such as azelaic acid, benzoyl peroxide (because P. acnes may play a role in rosacea), sulfacetamide (10%), and sulfur (5%).
  • Advances in ‘peptide technology’ have been found to help calm the inflammation associated with rosacea.
  • Specialised laser therapies – eg IPL (non-Laser intense pulsed light) or PDL (Pulsed dye Laser).
  • Short term oral antibiotics- however this is not ideal for gut health SO it should be followed with a course of probiotics.
  • One anti-aging product that is usually well tolerated is Retinol. Ideally it should be combined with gentle peptites.
  • Omega-3’s (Fish oil, flaxseed, walnuts, Sea Buckthorn
  • Probiotics …..see Gut-Skin
  • Avoiding or decreasing inflammatory foods such as wheat and unfermented dairy.
  • LED Light Therapy

 

SKINCARE

Sensitive Skin Skincare Treatment

The Skin barrier strength in rosacea is abnormal making a lot of skin products and cosmetics irritating.

1) Cleanse
Use emulsion type soap-free cleansers which sweep away makeup and other skin impurities without the use of harsh surfactants. Barrier nurturing ceramides are essential.

2) Calm
Dimethicone and allantoin can help to fortify the skin’s barrier and relieve irritation and dryness.

3) Nourish
It is important to replenish the skins natural moisture without the use of traditional emulsifiers. The aim being to hydrate and nourish.

4) Protect
Sun can play a role for rosacea sufferers. Daily lightweight sun protection is important.

827256E1-7677-4F2F-A11A-12FEB36942A9.jpeg

Soothe range of products ticks all bees boxes. For more information (including how to get a discount and free shipping) please email toraisherwood@gmail.com

OR visit
https://visherwood.myrandf.com/au

Gut Health & Your Mood

A slight deviation from dermatology. HOWEVER   ……not only is our gut linked to our SKIN, it can also influence our MOODS (and vica versa).

YES studies have identified that there is a strong link between our gut health and our emotions.

Our brain and our gut share much of the same tissue. Sometimes referred to as our ‘second brain’ our digestive system and our nervous system are link in many ways.

Our gut’s microbiome produces more ‘serotonin’ (our feel good hormone) than our brain. In fact approximately 85 per cent of our serotonin is found in our gut. In addition to this, there are a multitude of other neurotransmitters located in our gut. A clinical study involving (a large sample size of) patients with gut issues,  showed that anxiety and depression correlate strongly with their gut issues. Another study showed that when gut issues improved, so did depression and emotional problems.

Evidence also suggests that the gut microbiome can influence sleep quality and our circadian rhythm. Our mental health is closely linked to the quality and timing of our sleep.

So there is no wonder that…..

Improving gut health can not only boost our immune system and overall health (including our skin), it can also improve mood. For good gut health we need good gut flora. The bacteria should be varied and well balanced. Meaning  …more of the good guys than the bad! Read more about this in my previous Gut Article.

Easy steps to improve your gut health

  • Eat foods high in probiotics – eg Kombucha, Kefir, natural yogurt, saurkraut & kimchi or other fermented foods.
  • Avoid (or limit) inflammatory foods – Such as gluten, unfermented dairy, excessive alcohol, refined sugar & artificial sweeteners.
  • Eat fresh unprocessed foods – Include lots of vegetables & fruits that are high in fibre (lots have the additional benefit of being prebiotics – which are like fertilisers for our good bacteria).
  • Avoid unnecessary antibiotics – Which can wipe out our beneficial, protective gut bacteria.
  • Limit stress
  • If required supplement with high quality probiotic supplements  – taking a probiotic supplement can also naturally boost the good probiotics in your system. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are particularly good strains for improving mood. Supplementation can also be beneficial for sufferers of inflammatory skin problems like acne, psoriasis, rosacea and dermatitis.
  • Regular Moderate Exercise – has been shown to increase our guts (good) bacterial diversity and particularly increase Lactobacillus. Exercise also increases circulation, blood Flow, endorphins levels and reduced Stress.
  • See Gut-Skin Connection

SO…..

8A33D210-64C3-422C-BF9F-AB8677149C5B.jpeg

The answer is YES

Anti-Aging Super Foods

These anti-aging foods benefit your SKIN & so much more:-

  1. AVOCADO is superfood packed with monounsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants. They also contain phytochemicals and other essential nutrients to help prevent the negative effects of aging.
  2. Blueberries are rich in anthocyanins, a compound well known for its anti-aging effects. They are also packed with antioxidants – which fight free radicals throughout our bodies.
  3. The essential fatty acids EPA & DHA (omega 3’s) in oily FISH help boost hydration, assists with dermatitis, eczema, acne, inflammation, brain function, depression, anxiety, ADHD, heart health & so much more. SALMON, trout, sardines and mackerel are good examples. Salmon is particularly high in astaxanthin, a super antioxidant and carotenoid known for its unique anti-aging benefits. For plant based sources of omega-3’s, some great options are flaxseeds (try cold pressed flaxseed oil), chia & walnuts. 

630024EF-E8F8-4369-AE5D-E236CD0FCFEB.jpeg

4.  Hormonal decline is a common complaint of aging. MACA balances and helps normalise the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

5.  TURMERIC is well known for its anti-aging properties, and it has been used in cosmetic formulations for centuries. According to extensive research, the curcumin in turmeric has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is proving to help with:-

  • Arthritis – due to in anti-inflammatory effect.
  • Brain and other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s.
  • Type 2 diabetes- due to curcumins ability to help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Cholesterol – as it helps lower our bad LDL cholesterol.
  • Viruses – eg the flu
  • PMS

FF35A7F1-EE07-442C-87ED-FA38D1D42AF9.jpeg

6.  Dark chocolate (ideally 70% or higher cacao) is a superfood packed with antioxidants. These antioxidants are in the form of flavanols which help to protect our skin from free radical damage (helping it stay youthful for longer). Dark chocolate also contains:-  Magnesium, Iron, Copper, Manganese, Potassium, Phosphorus, Zinc & Selenium.

7.   Nuts (& seeds) are packed with protein and usually contain:- Essential fatty acids, Vitamin E, Zinc, B Vitamins, Selenium, fiber, L-arginine etc. Vitamin E protects skin from oxidative (cell) damage and supports healthy skin growth. Selenium (high levels are found in brazil nuts) is a powerful antioxidant, helping to support the immune system. Studies have even shown that a selenium rich diet can help to protect against skin cancer, age spots and sun damage. See previous article regarding the Skin benefits of Zinc, EFA’s etc.  Some good options are;- walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pecans & pumpkin seeds.

BE412355-4252-4DBE-B65C-435AFBD5A460

58983024-FA8C-49C7-AEBC-3ACE2406507B.jpeg

Is your GUT effecting your Skin??

946B3E74-86DC-4804-B637-557DD44E8CF5.png

More and more studies are linking our GUT health to our SKIN.

Our GUT does much more than purely absorbing nutrients and energy from our food. It also:-

  • Plays an important role in our immune system (about two thirds of our immune system lives in the gut).
  • Produces more than twenty four hormones that influence everything from our appetite to our mood and even our Skin.
  • Produces detoxifying enzymes (which also destroy harmful bacteria).

Probiotics are ‘goodbacteria that strengthen the lining of our gut, support our body’s ability to absorb nutrients and fight infection. Strengthening our gut lining is important, as this can help protect us from invaders such as bad bacteria, fungi and viruses. Having low levels of good bacteria allows these bad pathogens and toxins to leak out into the body (aka “leaky gut syndrome”). When our immune system detects these invaders, it overreacts by causing inflammation. This can then lead to inflammatory skin issues such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, dermatitis and rosacea.

Gut Skin Connection

Nutrients need to be absorbed correctly in the gut in order for growth, repair, and normal functioning to occur. When our gut is restricted (with the absorption of nutrients), it begins to prioritise which organs will get the few nutrients that are available. When nutrients are in short supply, the body priorities the essential organs like the heart, brain and liver. This results in our skin, hair and nails missing out.

SO for good gut health we need good gut flora. The bacteria should be varied and well balanced. Meaning …more of the good guys than the bad!

260A6CFE-3C3C-498D-8996-5F37B6B947C9.jpeg

So what can we do to help?

Probiotics

The best way to increase your levels of good bacteria is through food. Some good options include:-

  • Yoghurt – good old fashioned full fat natural yoghurt.
  • Feta – is rich in Lactobacillus & plantarum which have anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Fermented Foods – such as Saurkraut & Kimchi.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar.
  • Kefir – a fermented dairy drink rich in the beneficial probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus.
  • Miso – made from fermented soybeans, rice or barley.
  • Kombucha – an effervescent fermentation of black tea.

Supplementing with additional high quality probiotic supplements can be a great way to get more probiotics into your body. Taking a probiotic supplement can also naturally boost the good probiotics that are already in your system. Supplementation can be especially beneficial for sufferers of inflammatory skin problems like acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and dermatitis.

Prebiotics

Prebiotics are like fertilisers for your good gut flora. Examples include:-

  • Inulin found in onions, garlic, leeks, witlof, endive, Jerusalem artichokes, asparagus & bananas.
  • Fibre – such as flaxseeds, apples, oats.

487B0419-82E2-488B-9A4E-4A65437574AA

To avoid / limit

  • Sugar – bad bacteria feeds on sugar.
  • Artificial sweeteners – are now thought to harm the good bacteria in your gut.
  • Processed foods – are often loaded with sugar and gluten. They also often contain emulsifiers, which are added to a lot of processed foods to extend their shelf life ….and dramatically increase gut inflammation.
  • Unnecessary oral antibiotics – which can wipe out your beneficial, protective gut bacteria.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, which can cause intestinal and gut inflammation, damaging the lining and causing intestinal and gut permeability.
  • Stress – this connection is referred to as the gut-brain axis.
  • Alcohol – can irritate the stomach and intestines, cause inflammation and suppress certain vital hormone production.
  • Gluten – causes inflammation of the gut in most people.
  • Unfermented Dairy – can cause inflammation similar to gluten and sugar.

What else can help?

  • Exercise – researchers believe that exercise increases particular types of bacteria in the gut.
  • Sleep
  • Limiting stress (which decreases cortisol levels).
  • Bone broth – collagen is great for the gut and skin.

The importance of keeping things regular 

Our skin (which is our largest organ) is a major form of elimination for the body. If bowel motions aren’t regular, then toxins will need to be excreted elsewhere. 

As our face is covered in pores, it becomes the perfect back-up plan for excreting toxins. This can results in acne! SO, it’s really important to have regular bowel motions to ensure your body does not either store toxins or eliminate them via the skin. 

Good reads

  1. The Clever Guts Diet
    – Dr Michael Mosley
  2. GUT – The inside story of our body’s most under-rated organ. – Giulia Enders.

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology)

About / Contact 

Adult Acne

The hard Facts

  • Effects approximately 35% of women.
  • 41% of women experience premenstrual breakouts.
  • Can last on average 20 years.
  • Is the most common reason people visit a dermatologist.

img_5343WHY?

  • Pores being clogged with oil, bacteria and dead skin cells.
  • Hormones.
    Beginning in our 30’s our levels of androgens increase. This results in our sebaceous glands secreting thicker sebum, which clogs the pores and increases the likeliness of Acne (in a lot of adult women).
  • A high G.I diet.
    Studies have shown that a high-glycemic index (GI) diet (refined carbohydrates like those found in white bread and also sugar) can increase Acne. It’s suspected that raised insulin levels from high GI foods may trigger a release of hormones that inflame follicles and increase oil production.
  • Stress.
    Stress hormones such as cortisol can increase inflammation and stimulate oil glands.
  • Family history.
  • Poor gut health.
  • Too much unfermented dairy, gluten and sugar – which can all cause inflammation.
  • Using the wrong skincare products.
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies (Zinc & Vitamin A).

Treatment

  • Topical Retinoids such as Retinol.
    Retinol is a vitamin A derivative, which helps with the skins natural cellular renewal process. This can then help with acne and also wrinkles. Retinoids can be either prescription strength or OTC.
  • Suplementation with Zinc and Vitamin A.
  • Omega 3 supplementation – found in fish oil, Sea Buckthorn & flaxseeds clear acne by inhibiting two inflammatory chemicals that are responsible for acne breakouts, they are called PGE2 and LTB4. Omega-3’s do wonders for all inflammatory skin conditions.
  • See Kleresca the modern breakthrough in dermatology
  • Improving gut health.
    Through dietary changes, prebiotics and probiotics.
  • Oral prescription medication such as short term antibiotics (and I stress ‘short term’ due to the disruption in gut health’) or in severe cases Accutane (a synthetic vitamin A derivative). Note Accutane can have irritating side effects and must not be taken when pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Stress management
    Managing stress through exercise, meditation, or whatever method helps calm your nerves may also calm your skin.
  • Gently Cleanse your face and body as soon as you can after exercise.
  • Topical antibiotics (short term only).
  • Dietary adjustments. Cut out unfermented dairy which worsens acne because it spikes the acne-causing hormone IGF-1 & can increase inflammation.
  • Topical Benzoyl Peroxide.
    Kills the acne bacteria. However it can make skin dry and irritated if you use too much. Stick to spot-treating only so that you do not destroy your protective lipid barrier.
  • Skincare products (cleansers etc) containing Hydroxy acids (aka Glycolic, Lactic or Salicylic acid).
    Work by exfoliating gently to unclog pores, remove dead surface cells and also promote cell turnover. It’s in a lot of OTC cleansers and spot treatments. It can also reduces swelling and redness. However keep in mind that some products are way to harsh and can damage your lipid barrier.
  • A low GI diet (ditch the white carbs and sugar).
  • LED Light Therapy. Researchers have discovered that something as simple as light holds the key to clearing up acne. It is in fact clinically proven to reduce acne lesions by 70%. The blue light targets the acne bacteria and promotes the body’s own natural healing response to rejuvenate skin. SO your acne fades and your skin heals.
    –  Safe, effective, no down time
    –  Most skin types, all year round***LED treatments are extremely well priced at Laser Clinics Australia***

91DC16D4-59B7-42BA-9CAE-1D16313B1985

https://www.laserclinics.com.au/skin-care-treatment/led-light-therapy

  • Vitex supplementation  – can help with hormone related acne.

Additional Tips

– wash your pillow slip at least once weekly

– clean your mobile phone screen regularly

– avoid touching your face

– clean makeup brushes regularly as they are a breading ground for bacteria.

– never wear makeup to bed as it will clog your pores and  cause acne.

For Laser Clinics Australia LED Light Bookings:- 

Brookvale ph: 80148911

Warriewood ph: 83192078