Exercise for Healthy Skin

Exercise helps keep our skin healthy and vibrant. The multiple benefits of exercise include:-

1) Increased circulation, including blood flow. This
results in oxygen and nutrients being delivered to
our skin.
2) An increase in blood flow, also helps waste products
to be carried away from our skin.
3) Endorphins (our feel good hormones) are produced. This subsequently helps reduce stress levels and cortisol. This can result in an improvement of acne, eczema and other skin conditions.

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Other Benefits of Exercise

  • better sleep
  • stronger bones
  • better mood
  • live longer
  • decreased risk of heart disease & certain cancers
  • increased energy
  • increased self esteem

Anti-Aging Super Foods

These anti-aging foods benefit your SKIN & so much more:-

  1. AVOCADO is superfood packed with monounsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants. They also contain phytochemicals and other essential nutrients to help prevent the negative effects of aging.
  2. Blueberries are rich in anthocyanins, a compound well known for its anti-aging effects. They are also packed with antioxidants – which fight free radicals throughout our bodies.
  3. The essential fatty acids EPA & DHA (omega 3’s) in oily FISH help boost hydration, assists with dermatitis, eczema, acne, inflammation, brain function, depression, anxiety, ADHD, heart health & so much more. SALMON, trout, sardines and mackerel are good examples. Salmon is particularly high in astaxanthin, a super antioxidant and carotenoid known for its unique anti-aging benefits. For plant based sources of omega-3’s, some great options are flaxseeds (try cold pressed flaxseed oil), chia & walnuts. 

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4.  Hormonal decline is a common complaint of aging. MACA balances and helps normalise the hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

5.  TURMERIC is well known for its anti-aging properties, and it has been used in cosmetic formulations for centuries. According to extensive research, the curcumin in turmeric has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It is proving to help with:-

  • Arthritis – due to in anti-inflammatory effect.
  • Brain and other neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s.
  • Type 2 diabetes- due to curcumins ability to help stabilise blood sugar levels.
  • Cholesterol – as it helps lower our bad LDL cholesterol.
  • Viruses – eg the flu
  • PMS

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6.  Dark chocolate (ideally 70% or higher cacao) is a superfood packed with antioxidants. These antioxidants are in the form of flavanols which help to protect our skin from free radical damage (helping it stay youthful for longer). Dark chocolate also contains:-  Magnesium, Iron, Copper, Manganese, Potassium, Phosphorus, Zinc & Selenium.

7.   Nuts (& seeds) are packed with protein and usually contain:- Essential fatty acids, Vitamin E, Zinc, B Vitamins, Selenium, fiber, L-arginine etc. Vitamin E protects skin from oxidative (cell) damage and supports healthy skin growth. Selenium (high levels are found in brazil nuts) is a powerful antioxidant, helping to support the immune system. Studies have even shown that a selenium rich diet can help to protect against skin cancer, age spots and sun damage. See previous article regarding the Skin benefits of Zinc, EFA’s etc.  Some good options are;- walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pecans & pumpkin seeds.

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Common Skin Conditions – What to avoid & what can help.

Four Common Skin Conditions

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Rosacea
An Inflammatory disorder causing redness and sometimes small pimples on the face. The small surface blood vessels (capillaries) enlarge, giving the appearance of a flushed face.
The exact cause is not 100% known. However avoiding the ten below things can help manage the symptoms.
Specific triggers to avoid include stress, high temperatures (including hot baths & saunas), spicy foods, alcohol, some cosmetics, sun exposure, hot drinks and food.

Acne
Obstruction and inflammation of sebaceous glands which leads to infection.
Common triggers include hormonal changes during puberty, pregnancy, perimenopause + fluctuations during (certain days) of the menstrual cycle.                                …..See previous adult acne article.

Eczema
Chronic immune-mediated inflammation of the skin involving genetic and environmental factors.
Specific triggers include stress, exposure to allergens (such as dust mite, foods & cosmetics), and dry air.
Linked to asthma and allergic rhinitis.

Psoriasis
A chronic systemic inflammatory disorder. It occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks normal tissues in the body. Skin cells build up and form scales and itchy dry patches. Triggers can include stress, infections, medications, sunburn, poor gut health.

10 common causes of these skin conditions

  1. Nutritional deficiencies
  2. Hormonal imbalances
  3. Poor gut health including intestinal dyobiosis
  4. Stress
  5. Thyroid problems
  6. Immune system abnormalities
  7. Infection (bacterial, parasitic or viral)
  8. Medications
  9. Poor hygiene
  10. Allergies

 

Helpful Supplements

– when diet alone isn’t enough

Zinc
Is an absolutely essential micronutrient for the Skin. It helps with tissue growth & repair, inflammation and infection. Deficiency can present as rough or dry skin, dermatitis, skin lesions, an increase in skin infections and slow wound healing.

Vitamin A
Helps prevent skin infection (eg acne), helps with collagen production and wound healing. Vitamin A also has antioxidant properties , helping neutralize free radicals that cause tissue and cellular damage. Consult with your doctor before taking vitamin A supplements when pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

Vitamin C
Helps with tissue repair (including healing damaged skin), collagen synthesis, connective tissue, and the skins elasticity. A deficiency in vitamin C can lead to dry skin, increased bruising and impaired wound healing.

Essential fatty acids (Omega-3)
Helps with inflammation and wound healing.
Nourishes the Skin and helps prevent moisture loss. Deficiency contributes to eczema, psoriasis, sun spots, dandruff and also thinning hair. Oily fish like salmon, sardines, and tuna have fewer omega-3s than good quality capsules. Omega-3 supplements include Krill oil, Fish Oil or Sea buckthorn oil capsules.

Other Antioxidants (eg vitamin E, selenium, green tea, coenzyme Q10 etc)

Probiotics
Research has shown that the state of your gut has a great deal to do with the condition of your skin. Where there is gut inflammation, there is usually skin inflammation
See Gut Article

Turmeric

Curcumin is the active part of the turmeric plant. It is anti-inflammatory and can help with a wide variety of skin conditions. Curcumin has even been found to help clear mild psoriasis plaques, and prevent flare ups in some sufferers.

Silica
Is required to produce collagen and is a natural anti-inflammatory. Is good for Skin, hair and nails.

Other skin supplements include – echinacea, burdock, sea buckthorn (a vegetarian source of Omega fatty acids), yellow dock, cleavers etc.

Skin Treatments

See LED Light Therapy

Skincare

Soothe has been named as the favourite regimen by The Sydney Morning Herald & has recently been reviewed in Allure. This regimen uses RFp3 Peptite technology -A breakthrough combination of skin soothing peptides & skin detoxifying peptides working with a protease inhibitor at the skins surface to neutralise triggers & reduce visible signs of redness. If you suffer from sensitive, red or irritated skin …..this may be the product for you! It comes with a R+F 60 day money back guarantee. Please contact me to find out how to save 10% on this product and to receive free shipping. Or why not try the Solution Tool to get a personalised Skin Regime

https://visherwood.myrandf.com/au

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Some Supplement Recommendations-

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Note- We know Fish oil has many health benefits due to the essential fatty acids EPA & DHA (omega 3’s). However there are fish oils and there are fish oils. SO many of the ones found in our supermarkets are manufactured cheaply and can even be rancid! BioCeuticals fish oil undergoes strict testing to ensure its purity & to make sure it is of the highest quality, using ethically sourced fish free of heavy metals.

Perimenopause & Skin

Permenopause ….who me??

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Perimenopause usually starts in a woman’s late 30’s or early 40s. It can however start earlier or later. It is a transitional period caused by hormone fluctuations, particularly the levels of circulating estrogen and progesterone. This period can last up to 10 years.

Due to the shifts in hormone production, perimenopause can bring about many symptoms. Unlike full-fledged (or early menopause), you continue to ovulate and you are still producing estrogen. In fact, your hormones will often test in the “normal” range.

Some of the typical changes that occur during this period of estrogen and Progesterone fluctuations (and then decline) include:-

  • Skin Changes – eg …dryer, thinning, adult acne, Rosacea, pigmentation, increased sensitivity, less elastic, itchy, lines and wrinkles & volume loss.
  • Hot Flushes
  • Trouble sleeping
  • poorer concentration & also memory
  • Mood swings
  • Night sweats
  • Increased PMS symptoms
  • Fatigue
  • Irregular periods – often short cycles + heavier bleeding.
  • Weight changes
  • Decrease in breast volume
  • Change in sex drive
  • If estrogen and / or progesterone dip to low (often  right before your period), a migraine headache can be triggered.

Specific SKIN Changes

Changes in our skin predominantly occur due to:-

  • the multiple effects of hormonal fluctuations
  • a shrinking skeleton
  • decreased collagen production
  • accumulated sun damage over the years

Adult Acne
Beginning in our 30’s, our levels of androgens increase. Testosterone stimulates sebaceous glands to secrete thicker sebum. This can cause clogged pores and an increase the likeliness of adult Acne.

…...see ‘Adult Acne’ Article for more information 

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Facial Hair
Due to the unstable progesterone / estrogen levels + increased testosterone, some women may develop the odd sprout (or two or three) of facial hair, particularly in the chin area.

Sagging Skin and Wrinkles:
When progesterone levels drop (causing estrogen to become unstable), fat deposits tend to become redistributed. Fat pads in our face (which provide support and structure) diminish. Instead our adipose cells can become more concentrated around the abdomen, thighs and buttocks. Leading Dermatologist Dr Kathy Fields describes this as “fat redistribution from our face to our Fanny” 😳. The result of this loss of volume in our face, can be the formation of wrinkles and skin that appears less taut.

Continuous muscle contraction over the years, is another major contributor of facial wrinkles. Continuous muscle movement causes ‘dynamic wrinkles’ which only appear when the muscle is used, however, over time, if untreated, these wrinkles can become ‘static wrinkles’ which means they become permanently etched in our skin.

Thiner less elastic Skin:
Collagen is the supportive protein structure of our skin. It helps give skin it’s youthful plumpness. Skin stays more supple when there is enough progesterone …..which helps stimulate the production of collagen.

More Prone to Sun Damage:

The maintenance of Melanocytes (cells that manufacture the pigment Melanin) is under the control of estrogens. As we move closer to menopause, the number of melanocytes in the skin is reduced. With less melanocytes, we produce less of the protective melanin and skin appears lighter. Our skin is therefore more prone to sun damage.

Pigmentation:
As estrogen helps regulate the production of melanin (pigment), melanin synthesis can increase (when estrogen decreases). This can then lead to brown “age spots”. These can appear on the face, hands, neck, arms and chest of many women. This is particularly evident in areas of our skin that have been exposed to the sun over the years.

Dry and sometimes itchy skin

Estrogen stimulates the production of oils in our skin and also our skins ability to hold moisture. So when estrogen production diminishes  – dry and sometimes itchy skin becomes common.

What can help?

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  • A healthier diet – a healthy outside starts on the inside.
  • Skip long hot showers which drys our Skin out.
  • Supplements – such as Zinc (can do wonders for Skin), probiotics (as gut health is linked to Skin health), Omega 3’s which help with inflammation and dryness, Vitex, Sage, black cohosh etc. Speak to a naturopath.

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  • Sun protection +++
  • Upgrade your Skincare Regime / Products – to suit your changing skin conditions.
  • read previous Gut Article!!
  • See previous Adult Acne Article!!
  • Retinol (Vitamin A) based night serums – is anti-aging as it helps with collagen building and the rate at which skin cells generate. Amp up your results even further by using a dermal-roller prior.

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  • Visit the Solution Tool for further advice regarding which products will best suit your individual skin concerns.
  • Going to bed earlier – as lack of sleep can add to hormonal imbalance, inflammatory skin conditions and adult acne.  Aim for 7-9 hours per night.
  • Manage stress – as cortisol can trigger skin conditions such as psoriasis, rosacea and acne. Stress also robs us of progesterone.
  • Exercise – helps with circulation (blood flow to your skin) and also stress management. See previous article.
  • Quit smoking as it has been linked to early menopause.
  • Progesterone Cream helps a lot of women with Perimenopausal symptoms in general. I highly recommend Ona’s Natural Progesterone Cream

To receive a discount on Ona’s natural progesterone cream use code : Vskin10

  • Some people choose to get muscle relaxant injections – these work to prevent the formation of static wrinkles by stopping the signal between the nerve and muscle. The decreased movement in the muscle places less stress on the skin helping to give a fresh and youthful appearance. Anti-wrinkle injections are made from a purified protein that temporarily causes facial muscles to relax, instantly softening lines and wrinkles and reducing the severity of visible wrinkles.
  • Hyaluronic dermal filler injections – once again, this is a personal choice made by some people. A dermal filler helps re-volumise and hydrate the face. Made from hyaluronic gel – a natural sugar already present in the human body. Hyaluronic can help restore fullness and volume in numerous facial areas. See here for more
  • Vitex – has been traditionally used in Western herbal medicine for menstrual cycle irregularities and to help relieve symptoms associated with PMS. It can also provide symptomatic relief of hormone-induced acne.

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LEAVE YOUR SKIN CLEAR, ENERGISED & REJUVENATED – with LED Therapy

It can be lights, camera, action all year round with LED.

Non-invasive LED Light Therapy works at a cellular level. The soothing, deep penetrating LED lights target deep into cells heightening their internal functions, photo-stimulating dermal blood flow, and inducing faster healing so your skin always looks rejuvenated.

  • Increased blood circulation
  • Acne treatment
  • Rosacea reduction
  • Skin rejuvenation and improved skin texture
  • Lines and wrinkles
  • Wound healing
  • Pain relief
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Arthritis
  • Muscle spasm

 

LED Blue Light

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Specifically targets active acne.

  • Is clinically proven to reduce acne lesions by 70%.
  • Targets the acne bacteria and promotes the body’s own natural healing response to rejuvenate skin. SO your acne fades and your skin heals
  • Safe, effective, no down time.
  • Most skin types, all year round.

 

LED Yellow Light

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Penetrates deep in to the layers of the skin causing rejuvenation, cell repair and increased circulation.

  • Skin Rejuvenation
  • Wound Healing

Is also very effective after skin treatments (such as Dermal Rolling, Fractional RF, Peals and Cosmetic injections).

LED Light Therapy is pain free and in fact very relaxing. There is no down time and the treatment only takes approximately 15 minuets. SO they can easily be squeezed into your busy schedule.

LED Treatments are very affordable at Laser Clinics Australia.

http://www.laserclinics.com.au

 

 

Is your GUT effecting your Skin??

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More and more studies are linking our GUT health to our SKIN.

Our GUT does much more than purely absorbing nutrients and energy from our food. It also:-

  • Plays an important role in our immune system (about two thirds of our immune system lives in the gut).
  • Produces more than twenty four hormones that influence everything from our appetite to our mood and even our Skin.
  • Produces detoxifying enzymes (which also destroy harmful bacteria).

Probiotics are ‘goodbacteria that strengthen the lining of our gut, support our body’s ability to absorb nutrients and fight infection. Strengthening our gut lining is important, as this can help protect us from invaders such as bad bacteria, fungi and viruses. Having low levels of good bacteria allows these bad pathogens and toxins to leak out into the body (aka “leaky gut syndrome”). When our immune system detects these invaders, it overreacts by causing inflammation. This can then lead to inflammatory skin issues such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, dermatitis and rosacea.

Gut Skin Connection

Nutrients need to be absorbed correctly in the gut in order for growth, repair, and normal functioning to occur. When our gut is restricted (with the absorption of nutrients), it begins to prioritise which organs will get the few nutrients that are available. When nutrients are in short supply, the body priorities the essential organs like the heart, brain and liver. This results in our skin, hair and nails missing out.

SO for good gut health we need good gut flora. The bacteria should be varied and well balanced. Meaning …more of the good guys than the bad!

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So what can we do to help?

Probiotics

The best way to increase your levels of good bacteria is through food. Some good options include:-

  • Yoghurt – good old fashioned full fat natural yoghurt.
  • Feta – is rich in Lactobacillus & plantarum which have anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Fermented Foods – such as Saurkraut & Kimchi.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar.
  • Kefir – a fermented dairy drink rich in the beneficial probiotic Lactobacillus Acidophilus.
  • Miso – made from fermented soybeans, rice or barley.
  • Kombucha – an effervescent fermentation of black tea.

Supplementing with additional high quality probiotic supplements can be a great way to get more probiotics into your body. Taking a probiotic supplement can also naturally boost the good probiotics that are already in your system. Supplementation can be especially beneficial for sufferers of inflammatory skin problems like acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and dermatitis.

Prebiotics

Prebiotics are like fertilisers for your good gut flora. Examples include:-

  • Inulin found in onions, garlic, leeks, witlof, endive, Jerusalem artichokes, asparagus & bananas.
  • Fibre – such as flaxseeds, apples, oats.

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To avoid / limit

  • Sugar – bad bacteria feeds on sugar.
  • Artificial sweeteners – are now thought to harm the good bacteria in your gut.
  • Processed foods – are often loaded with sugar and gluten. They also often contain emulsifiers, which are added to a lot of processed foods to extend their shelf life ….and dramatically increase gut inflammation.
  • Unnecessary oral antibiotics – which can wipe out your beneficial, protective gut bacteria.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, which can cause intestinal and gut inflammation, damaging the lining and causing intestinal and gut permeability.
  • Stress – this connection is referred to as the gut-brain axis.
  • Alcohol – can irritate the stomach and intestines, cause inflammation and suppress certain vital hormone production.
  • Gluten – causes inflammation of the gut in most people.
  • Unfermented Dairy – can cause inflammation similar to gluten and sugar.

What else can help?

  • Exercise – researchers believe that exercise increases particular types of bacteria in the gut.
  • Sleep
  • Limiting stress (which decreases cortisol levels).
  • Bone broth – collagen is great for the gut and skin.

The importance of keeping things regular 

Our skin (which is our largest organ) is a major form of elimination for the body. If bowel motions aren’t regular, then toxins will need to be excreted elsewhere. 

As our face is covered in pores, it becomes the perfect back-up plan for excreting toxins. This can results in acne! SO, it’s really important to have regular bowel motions to ensure your body does not either store toxins or eliminate them via the skin. 

Good reads

  1. The Clever Guts Diet
    – Dr Michael Mosley
  2. GUT – The inside story of our body’s most under-rated organ. – Giulia Enders.

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology)

About / Contact 

Adult Acne

The hard Facts

  • Effects approximately 35% of women.
  • 41% of women experience premenstrual breakouts.
  • Can last on average 20 years.
  • Is the most common reason people visit a dermatologist.

img_5343WHY?

  • Pores being clogged with oil, bacteria and dead skin cells.
  • Hormones.
    Beginning in our 30’s our levels of androgens increase. This results in our sebaceous glands secreting thicker sebum, which clogs the pores and increases the likeliness of Acne (in a lot of adult women).
  • A high G.I diet.
    Studies have shown that a high-glycemic index (GI) diet (refined carbohydrates like those found in white bread and also sugar) can increase Acne. It’s suspected that raised insulin levels from high GI foods may trigger a release of hormones that inflame follicles and increase oil production.
  • Stress.
    Stress hormones such as cortisol can increase inflammation and stimulate oil glands.
  • Family history.
  • Poor gut health.
  • Too much unfermented dairy, gluten and sugar – which can all cause inflammation.
  • Using the wrong skincare products.
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies (Zinc & Vitamin A).

Treatment

  • Topical Retinoids such as Retinol.
    Retinol is a vitamin A derivative, which helps with the skins natural cellular renewal process. This can then help with acne and also wrinkles. Retinoids can be either prescription strength or OTC.
  • Suplementation with Zinc and Vitamin A.
  • Omega 3 supplementation – found in fish oil, Sea Buckthorn & flaxseeds clear acne by inhibiting two inflammatory chemicals that are responsible for acne breakouts, they are called PGE2 and LTB4. Omega-3’s do wonders for all inflammatory skin conditions.
  • See Kleresca the modern breakthrough in dermatology
  • Improving gut health.
    Through dietary changes, prebiotics and probiotics.
  • Oral prescription medication such as short term antibiotics (and I stress ‘short term’ due to the disruption in gut health’) or in severe cases Accutane (a synthetic vitamin A derivative). Note Accutane can have irritating side effects and must not be taken when pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Stress management
    Managing stress through exercise, meditation, or whatever method helps calm your nerves may also calm your skin.
  • Gently Cleanse your face and body as soon as you can after exercise.
  • Topical antibiotics (short term only).
  • Dietary adjustments. Cut out unfermented dairy which worsens acne because it spikes the acne-causing hormone IGF-1 & can increase inflammation.
  • Topical Benzoyl Peroxide.
    Kills the acne bacteria. However it can make skin dry and irritated if you use too much. Stick to spot-treating only so that you do not destroy your protective lipid barrier.
  • Skincare products (cleansers etc) containing Hydroxy acids (aka Glycolic, Lactic or Salicylic acid).
    Work by exfoliating gently to unclog pores, remove dead surface cells and also promote cell turnover. It’s in a lot of OTC cleansers and spot treatments. It can also reduces swelling and redness. However keep in mind that some products are way to harsh and can damage your lipid barrier.
  • A low GI diet (ditch the white carbs and sugar).
  • LED Light Therapy. Researchers have discovered that something as simple as light holds the key to clearing up acne. It is in fact clinically proven to reduce acne lesions by 70%. The blue light targets the acne bacteria and promotes the body’s own natural healing response to rejuvenate skin. SO your acne fades and your skin heals.
    –  Safe, effective, no down time
    –  Most skin types, all year round***LED treatments are extremely well priced at Laser Clinics Australia***

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https://www.laserclinics.com.au/skin-care-treatment/led-light-therapy

  • Vitex supplementation  – can help with hormone related acne.

Additional Tips

– wash your pillow slip at least once weekly

– clean your mobile phone screen regularly

– avoid touching your face

– clean makeup brushes regularly as they are a breading ground for bacteria.

– never wear makeup to bed as it will clog your pores and  cause acne.

For Laser Clinics Australia LED Light Bookings:- 

Brookvale ph: 80148911

Warriewood ph: 83192078