Cellulite Fast Facts

In a nutshell ….the dimpled appearance of Cellulite is caused by fat deposits pushing through the connective tissue beneath the skin.

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Physicians refer to cellulite as edematous ‘fibrosclerotic panniculopathy (EFP)’. It usually affects the buttocks and thighs but can also occur in other areas. Even thin women can have cellulite!

Contributors factors

• Weak collagen structure of the skin

• Hormonal changes

• Being overweight or having increased body fat

• Lack of physical activity

• Poor diet

• Fluid retention

• Dehydration

• Lack of circulation (blood flow)

• Smoking

• Genetics

Why does cellulite effect women more than men?

Cellulite can affect both men and women. However it is more common in females, due to the different distributions of fat, muscle, and connective tissue. Women’s fat is typically distributed in the thighs, hips and buttocks — which are common areas for cellulite.

As women age, their bodies produce less estrogen. Less estrogen can lead to poorer circulation. This can contribute to a decrease in new collagen production and the breakdown of older connective tissue.

People often think that getting older causes cellulite. However it’s more that the effects of mature skin make cellulite more noticeable. Ie ..it can ‘appear’ worse because as the skin ages, it becomes thinner and loses elasticity.

FACTS

Exercise can decrease the appearance of cellulite

Regular exercise boosts circulation and can help disguise cellulite by increasing muscle tone under the skin. Exercise also improves lymphatic drainage, which carries toxins away from cells. If drainage is sluggish it will contribute to cellulite.

Also, having more muscle makes your skin look smoother and firmer.

Hormones

Hormones can play a role in cellulite development. Estrogen, insulin, noradrenaline, thyroid hormones, and prolactin influence the cellulite production process.

Dehydration

Dehydration can causes thinner (as well as drier & weaker) skin – which has a much greater tendency to show cellulite.

It’s also believed that not getting enough water can cause toxic buildup in the fat cells (that is then difficult for the body to metabolise).

Smoking

Cigarette smoke reduces blood flow and circulation, which weakens and disrupts the formation of collagen. This causes the connective tissue to stretch, weaken and become damaged more easily. As a result, more cellulite will show through.

Genetics

Genetic factors can be linked to a person’s speed of metabolism, distribution of fat under the skin, and circulatory levels. These can affect the chance of cellulite developing.

Treatment?

Cellulite is a difficult condition to treat, there is no procedure on the market that effectively removes all cellulite permanently. However, the appearance of cellulite can be reduced using a combination of lifestyle changes and medical grade technologies.

Some procedures for cellulite really do work, however the results are often temporary.

Laser treatment – Also called Radiofrequency (RF)

May improve the appearance of cellulite for up to a year or more.

Cellfina – This Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared minimally invasive treatment is proven to improve the appearance of cellulite for at least two years.

After the area is numbed, a Doctor inserts a small device through the skin near each cellulite dimple. There is a tiny, rapidly vibrating blade on the end of the device, which divides the band causing the cellulite dimple. This is repeated for each dimple until the procedure is complete. The downside: It costs around $4K and you will have some temporary bruising.

See more about Cellfina here.

Cellulaze – Similarly to Cellfina, this procedure is designed to break down the structure of cellulite beneath your skin—except it uses lasers rather than blades.

This popular FDA-approved laser treatment involves a doctor injecting numbing solution (into the area to be treated), then a laser is inserted under the skin. It shoots heat in three directions. A 75% improvement is expected. The small laser helps increase skin thickness, release the bands that create dimples, stimulate collagen production, and flatten out fat. Results are supposed to last for about a year or two.

Cryolipolysis – This treatment can reduce fat by freezing the lipids in fat cells. While it can be very effective for getting rid of small pockets of unwanted fat, it will only slightly (if at all) decrease cellulite.

Velashape – This handheld device uses infrared light to help reduce fat layers. It’s FDA-approved, and is considered a non-invasive treatment (meaning it doesn’t require injections or cuts).  It involves a combination of infrared therapy and mechanical massage to increase lymphatic drainage, while reducing the actual size of the fat cells and fat chambers. The device is pressed on the surface of skin, with results starting to appear after about four treatments.

Subcision – Involves a specialist putting a needle under the skin to break up the connective tissue bands. Results can last 2 years or more.

Carboxytherapy – Involves inserting carbon dioxide gas under the skin. ‘Some’ cellulite might disappear. Side effects include bruising and discomfort after the procedure,

Endermologie – Involves a deep massage with a vacuum-like device that lifts the skin. The (FDA) have approved it as safe, however there is little evidence that it is guaranteed to reduce cellulite.

Skin-firming creams? – There is limited evidence proving creams or scrubs with stimulant ingredients (like caffeine, ginger and green or black tea), help by improving circulation and breaking down fat-cell stores. However products containing Retinol may help create a slightly thicker skin cover that can help camouflage cellulite.

The Truth about Stretch Marks

Stretch marks are long, narrow scar-like streaks that develop on the skin. They usually occur when the skin cannot resume normal form after a period of being stretched or shrunk quickly. This includes:-

  • A growth spurt during puberty
  • Pregnancy
  • Weight gain
  • Bodybuilding- Rapid development of muscle mass

Stretch marks result from:-

  • The tearing of the dermis (middle layer of skin).
  • The normal production of collagen (which makes up the connective tissue in our skin) being disrupted when the skin is overstretched.

Stretch marks can also be called striae, striae distensae (SD), striae atrophicans, and striae gravidarum.

There is some evidence to suggest that genetics can sometimes play a role in susceptibility to stretch marks. 

Approximately 75% of women experience stretch marks from pregnancy.

Early stretch marks are usually red or purple. Over time, stretch marks lose their colour and become white or silvery in appearance. 

Although less common, stretch marks can also be caused by:-

  • Certain Medical conditions: such as Marian Syndrome, and Cushing’s syndrome. Marfan syndrome can cause decreased elasticity in the skin tissue, and Cushing’s syndrome can cause an over production of a hormone (cortisol) that leads to rapid weight gain and skin fragility.
  • Prolonged use of corticosteroid creams and ointments (such as hydrocortisone)- which can decrease levels of collagen in the skin.
  • Also -people who have to take high doses of oral corticosteroids for months or longer.

Nutritional deficiencies can contribute to stretch marks. Especially low levels of Zinc, Vitamin C and Essential Fatty Acids. A diet high in processed foods can often cause a deficiency in these nutrients.

Foods that can help

A diet high in essential fatty acids (EFA’s) help maintain a healthy skin cell membrane. Fish rich in EFA’s include salmon, sardines, mackerel (& other oily fish). Certain nuts & seeds, avocados, and flaxseed oil are also good forms of EFA’s.

Vitamin C is an important nutrient for the development of collagen. Vitamin C is found in many fruits and vegetables. Eg Citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons, berries, cherries, papaya, peppers (capsicum) kale, broccoli etc.

Protein is required to make Collagen. Good sources include lean red meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy & lentils.

Zinc is also important for collagen production, as well as skin repair and healing. Zinc rich foods include nuts (especially brazil nuts), fish, meats (such as beef, lamb, pork & turkey), eggs, dairy, quinoa and legumes. These zinc rich foods are important to help keep your skin healthy.

Vitamin A protects skin health and also encourages the formation of new skin cells. Liver and cod liver oil are excellent sources Of Vitamin A. Other good sources include bright orange vegetables and fruits (such as carrots, sweet potatoes, mangos and apricots) and leafy greens such as spinach and kale.

What else can help

Staying hydrated

Drinking enough water can help keep our skin supple and hydrated. As does applying topical hydrating and moisturising products. Soft hydrated skin tends to be more elastic and does not to develop stretch marks as easily as dry skin does.

Hyaluronic acid

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD),  two large studies showed that applying hyaluronic acid to early stretch marks made the stretch marks less noticeable.

Retinol 

Another study showed that people who applied a good strength Retinol cream every night for 24 weeks had less noticeable stretch marks. Those who didn’t apply the cream saw their early stretch marks grow. Other studies have found similar results.

Sunless self-tanner

While tanning can make stretch marks more noticeable, a good quality sunless self-tanner can camouflage stretch marks.

The following procedures can decrease the look of stretch marks:-

  • Fractioned Laser Therapy – helps stimulate the skins collagen and elastin. There are various types of laser therapy. C02 Laser Therapy is another. See more here
  • Skin needling .  See more info here
  • Chemical peels – resulting in peeling off the top layers of damaged, dead skin to activate new skin cell production. 

Other

Oder stretch marks that are white or shiny silver in appearance, are much harder to treat. On the other hand, if they are redish or pink in colour, there is a better chance of improvement.

 Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology)

Protection – A skincare step NOT to miss!

In a world where people are spending thousands of dollars on skincare products and treatments (for anti-ageing and pigment correction), it’s ironic that the most simple, yet neglected step is sun protection.

We know that the sun is a major contributor to aging skin. It causes sun spots, wrinkles, dullness, hyper pigmentation, broken blood vessels, enlarged pores, thickened skin and more.

Pigmentation is usually the result of too much sun, creating freckles, age spots or larger discoloured skin patches. Research has shown that it is one of the biggest contributors to looking older – equal to wrinkles.

Fast facts

The vast majority of visible signs of ageing or hyperpigmentation are a result of the sun …and its damaging UV rays. In fact, up to 80% of premature ageing is thought to be attributed to the sun.

Australia experiences some of the highest levels of UV radiation in the world (due to our proximity to the equator and frequent blue skies). 

MUST-KNOW FACTS ABOUT SUMMER SUN PROTECTION

1. What’s the difference between UVA and UVB rays?

Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays emit the same amount of radiation from sunrise to sunset, 365 days a year. Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays are stronger in the summer, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

2. Are UVA and UVB rays equally harmful to skin?

Yes, but they affect it in different ways. UVB rays are responsible for sunburn and skin redness. (Think “B” for “burning.”) They cause inflammation, surface dryness and excess dry skin buildup.

UVA rays are weaker than UVB rays but pass further into your skin. They stimulate excess pigment, resulting in dark marks, age spots and dullness. UVAs also break down collagen and elastin, causing lines, wrinkles and sagging. UVA rays can penetrate glass, which means they harm your skin even while indoors.

3. What does SPF stand for, and how does it work?

SPF is short for “Sun Protection Factor.” The higher the SPF, the more protection. But exactly how long a sunscreen protects you depends on your skin color and its tolerance to UVB rays.

To get a sense of how long you can stay in the sun, multiply your sunscreen’s SPF number by the amount of time it takes your skin to burn in the sun.

If your skin turns red in 10 minutes without sun protection, your math would look like this:

• SPF 15 x 10 minutes = 150 minutes (2 ½ hours) without getting burned

• SPF 30 x 10 minutes = 300 minutes (5 hours) without getting burned

…but there’s a little more to it than this. First, no sunscreen can block out 100% of the sun’s rays. Since you can’t rely on sunscreen for complete protection, be sure to cover up your body and wear a big hat and sunglasses.

4. What’s the difference between physical sunscreen and chemical sunscreen?

The two types of sunscreens protect skin in different ways and have different properties. Physical sunscreens, such as zinc oxide, reflect and scatter light and are gentle on skin — which is why Rodan + Fields UNBLEMISH and SOOTHE sunscreens are physical sunscreens. Chemical screens, such as avobenzone, absorb light and blend well with more ingredients. Rodan + Fields REVERSE, REDEFINE and ESSENTIALS sunscreens are chemical sunscreens.

Whether physical or chemical, all broad-spectrum sunscreens should be formulated to protect against damage from both UVA and UVB rays.

5. How much sunscreen do I need?

More than you probably think! Apply one tablespoon of sunscreen to your face and one ounce — the amount that would fill a shot glass — to your body for adequate sun protection.

6. How frequently should I reapply sunscreen?

One application of sunscreen won’t protect your skin for the entire day. You should reapply sunscreen every two hours — more frequently if you’ve been in the water. This is true even if you’re using a sunscreen with a high SPF.

See here for another great product which contains SPF

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Skincare)

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Is It Possible To Have Glowing Skin after 50?

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Changes in our SKIN after 50 predominantly occur due to

  • The multiple effects of hormonal fluctuations
  • A shrinking skeleton
  • Decreased collagen production
  • Accumulated sun damage over the years
  • Repetitive facial expressions over the years (causing lines and wrinkles to become etched in).

Some of the typical skin changes that occur during this period of estrogen decline:-

  • Dryer (and sometimes itchy) skin
  • Thinning skin
  • Decreased elasticity
  • Sensitivity
  • An increase in rosacea and other inflammatory skin conditions
  • Increased  pigmentation (äge spots”)
  • Lines and wrinkles & volume loss.

Fortunately, there’s lots we can do for healthy skin after 50 

Cleanse GENTLY

Cleansing is an important skin care step at every age. However, as we get older our skin becomes more delicate and drier. So we need to use a cleanser that is right for our skin. Choose either creamy formulas or cleansing masks -rather than harsh foam or gel cleansers (which can strip moisture away and compromise our delicate lipid barrier).

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

Oestrogen stimulates the production of oils in our skin and also our skins ability to hold moisture. So when oestrogen production diminishes  – dry and sometimes itchy skin becomes a common problem.

Although ‘Dry’ and ‘dehydrated’ seem like two words which describe the same thing;- there is a big difference when it comes to our skin! To put it simply, dehydrated skin lacks water and dry skin lacks oil / lipids.

In relation to skin care, hydration means increasing the amount of water in our skin cells, which results in a healthy, smooth and plump complexion. When our skin doesn’t have enough moisture, it gets scaly, rough and dull.

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Moisture and hydration skincare products do different things. A moisturiser tends not to hydrate the skin. Instead it forms a barrier to prevent moisture from escaping. A hydration product on the other hand – actually brings water to the skin. So, it is important that we give our skin the right combination of hydration and moisture.

If you are not using a serum now YOU SHOULD. Most contain effective anti-aging ingredients not typically found in other products such as cleansers, toners, moisturizers,or facial oils.

You Still Need SPF

The maintenance of Melanocytes (cells that manufacture the pigment Melanin) is under the control of estrogens. During menopause, the number of melanocytes in the skin is therefor reduced (due to a decrease in estrogen). Less melanocytes, means we produce less of the protective melanin. Our skin therefore becomes more prone to sun damage.

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Although a lot of the damage was caused by the amount of sun we got in our 20s, 30s, and 40’s, it’s still vital to protect our skin from further damage. So include a broad-spectrum SPF as part of your daily skincare regime.

Sunscreen for anti-aging

Hit the Brown Spots

Pigmentation äge spots” on the face, hands, and chest can look more obvious around menopause. Help prevent them by using sunscreen every day. Already got spots? See here

Clean up your DIET and consider your GUT

Eating foods rich with antioxidants can help your skin from the inside out. See more here regarding skin boosting super foods to increase in your diet and here for foods to avoid. Also consider:- Omega-3’s

Consider your Mental Health 

Our mind and skin are very much connected. This is now being referred to as Psychodermatogy.

Constant stress increases the production of our stress hormone ‘cortisol’. This then triggers inflammation and can also throw off other hormones in our body.  Increased inflammation is not good news for inflammatory skin disorders.

Stress can also disrupt the balance between the good and bad bacteria in our gut. As we know, our gut health can also cause havoc with our skin. See Gut Article

Take time during your day to reduce stress levels. Try yoga, meditation, pilates, going for a walk, reading OR any other stress-reduction techniques – to help reduce cortisol levels.

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Get Moving

Exercise helps keep our skin healthy and vibrant. The multiple benefits of exercise include:-

  1. Increased circulation, including blood flow. This
    results in oxygen and nutrients being delivered to
    our skin.
  2. An increase in blood flow, also helps waste products 
    to be carried away from our skin.
  3. Endorphins (our feel good hormones) are produced. This subsequently helps reduce stress levels and cortisol. This can result in an improvement of acne, eczema and other skin conditions.

Upgrade your Skincare regime

  • Upgrade your Skincare Regime / Products – to suit your changing skin conditions. Visit the Solution Tool for further advice regarding which skincare products will best suit your individual skin concerns.

Bulk Up on Beauty Sleep

Getting enough sleep helps your skin look younger. Lack of sleep can cause hormonal imbalances (and also decrease our metabolisms). It can also increase  flare-ups of inflammatory skin conditions and adult acne. getting adequate sleep helps prevent dark circles under our eyes, and it also gives the rest of our body a chance to recharge.  Aim for 7-9 hours per night.

Sleep and your skinAnd a Retinol serum at night

Retinol (Vitamin A) is clinically proven to make a huge impact on how skin ages. Dermatologists have been prescribing it for decades as the gold standard for promoting skin cell turnover and collagen production. It helps to correct lines, wrinkles, and scarring and can also help with breakouts.

Retinol benefits

Minimize Wrinkled Skin

Wrinkles are formed from a combination of too much sun over the years, hormonal change, repeated facial expressions, a loss of collagen, and thinning skin. Wrinkles are more obvious when our skin is dry. SO use a hydrating serum and a moisterising cream every day.

  • Some people choose to get muscle relaxant injections – these work to prevent the formation of static wrinkles by stopping the signal between the nerve and muscle. The decreased movement in the muscle places less stress on the skin helping to give a fresh and youthful appearance. Anti-wrinkle injections are made from a purified protein that temporarily causes facial muscles to relax, instantly softening lines and wrinkles and reducing the severity of visible wrinkles. Please contact Victoria for more information on Laser Clinics Australia bookings. Or visit the  LCA website
  • Hyaluronic dermal filler injections – once again, this is a personal choice made by some people. A dermal filler helps re-volumise and hydrate the face. Made from hyaluronic gel – a natural sugar already present in the human body. Hyaluronic can help restore fullness and volume in numerous facial areas. Visit here for more details.

Always use an Eye Cream.

The skin around the eye is thinner and more fragile. It requires a different efficacy and mix of ingredients than the skin on the rest of your face does.

Tip – Try keeping your eye cream in the fridge, as the cold cream will help constrict blood vessels to reduce puffy under eye bags in the mornings.

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Make sure your using skin products that suite YOUR skin type

It’s very important to choose cleansers, moisturizers, and a skin care routine formulated for your skin type. If you don’t know yours, find out at What’s Your Skin Type.

Skin Boosting Supplements

  • Certain supplements can do wonders for our skin especially if its a supplement your lacking in. For example Zinc, probiotics (see gut health), and Omega 3’s (which help with inflammation and dryness). See here for more

 

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse)

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse)

 

Keratosis Pilaris – Those annoying tiny bumps that can be found on the back of arms.

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Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition that causes patches of small rough raised bumps to appear on the skin. These tiny bumps (that look like pimples) are caused by a buildup of a protein called ‘Keratin’ (and also dead skin cells) at the opening of hair follicles. The condition sometimes gets referred to as ‘chicken skin’.

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The bumps usually appear on the upper arms (most common), thighs, and buttocks. Although less common, they can also show up the face. They are often accompanied with associated redness.

Those with dry skin, are more likely to have Keratosis Pilaris (KP). It may also occur in association with other skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis / eczema.  KP is usually worse in the winter months, when there’s less moisture in the air. It can often reduce slightly in the summer months.

Although Keratosis Pilaris can occur at any age, it is more common in children and teenagers. It usually reaches its peak prevalence in adolescence and for some, may disappear after the age of 30.

Keratosis Pilaris results from the buildup of keratin which forms a scaly plug that blocks the opening of the hair follicle. Usually many plugs form, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin.

Flare-ups can increase when there is a vitamin A deficiency.

Treatment?

There is generally no 100% cure for this harmless skin condition, however there are ways to greatly reduce the severity and to prevent it from getting worse.

What can help:-

  • Use a gentle soap free body wash (soap can exacerbate dryness). Avoid lathering agents such as sodium lauryl sulphate which dehydrate the skin and strips beneficial lipid layers.
  • Use a ‘gentle’ exfoliator once or twice per week to remove dead skin (without irritating the skin and adding to the problem). A great example is R+F ‘Microdermabrasion Paste’.
  • Topical Retinoids (Vitamin A) help prevent hair follicles from becoming plugged. It also helps with skin cell turnover. However be careful as some Retinol creams are drying. See here for a recommendation.
  • LED or Intense Pulsed Light (ILP).
  • Creams containing salicylic acid, lactic acid, glycolic or urea which help support regular skin-cell proliferation. A good moisturiser will help prevent water loss from the skin (ie dehydration).
  • Laser hair removal
  • Eat anti-inflammatory food such as Omega-3’s found in Salmon, Walnuts, Sea Buckthorn etc
  • Avoid inflammatory foods (non fermented dairy, gluten and sugar).
  • See Gut Health
  • Humidifiers – add moisture to the air, which can maintain the moisture in your skin and prevent itchy flare-ups.
  • Soothe 2 sensitive skin treatment
  • See Skin Supplements
  • Avoid long hot showers which dry the skin out.

More on Vitamin A

Low levels of this vitamin have been associated with inflammation and acne.

Carrots are a source of Vitamin A.  HOWEVER the Beta Carotene (in carrots) needs to be converted into vitamin A in your intestines by gut flora. If you do not have the right gut flora it just won’t happen. See Gut Article. The better absorbed source of vitamin A is from cod liver oil and organ meat, particularly liver.

 

Note:- Women who are pregnant, or breast feeding, or may become pregnant should speak to their treating Doctor or Midwife Before taking Vitamin A supplements or using topical retinoids.

Victoria Isherwood

Registered Nurse

Typical Skin Changes In Our 40’s + what we can do to help….

Life happens and somehow the years fly by. Then before we know it we are in our fourth decade.

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The changes….

Around our late 30’s / early 40s women typically go through a transitional period (which can last several years) caused by hormonal fluctuations. This period is often referred to as ‘perimenopause’.

Due to the shifts in hormone production (mainly progesterone and estrogen), perimenopause can bring about many changes. Unlike full-fledged (or early menopause), you DO continue to ovulate and you ARE still producing estrogen. In fact, your hormones will often test in the “normal” range.

Some of the typical changes that occur during this period of estrogen and progesterone fluctuations (and then decline) include:-

  • Skin Changes – eg …dryer, thinning, adult acne, rosacea, pigmentation, increased sensitivity, less elastic, itchy, lines and wrinkles & volume loss.
  • Hot Flushes
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Poorer concentration & also memory
  • Anxiety 
  • Mood swings
  • Night sweats
  • Increased PMS symptoms
  • Fatigue
  • Irregular periods – often short cycles + heavier bleeding.
  • Weight changes
  • Decrease in breast volume
  • Change in sex drive
  • Etc

Specific SKIN Changes

Changes in our skin predominantly occur due to:-

  • the multiple effects of hormonal fluctuations
  • a shrinking skeleton
  • decreased collagen production
  • accumulated sun damage over the years
  • Repetitive facial expressions over the years (causing lines and wrinkles to become etched in). See more info here.

Adult Acne:

Beginning in our 30’s, our levels of androgens increase. Testosterone stimulates sebaceous glands to secrete thicker sebum. This can cause clogged pores and an increase the likeliness of adult Acne.

……see ‘Adult Acne’ Article for more information 

Facial Hair:

Due to the unstable progesterone / estrogen levels + increased testosterone, some women may develop the odd sprout (or two or three) of facial hair, particularly in the chin area.

Sagging Skin and Wrinkles:

When progesterone levels drop (causing estrogen to become unstable), fat deposits tend to become redistributed. Fat pads in our face (which provide support and structure) diminish. Instead our adipose cells can become more concentrated around the abdomen, thighs and buttocks. Leading Dermatologist Dr Kathy Fields describes this as “fat redistribution from our face to our Fanny” 😳. The result of this loss of volume in our face, can be the formation of wrinkles and skin that appears less taut.

Continuous muscle contraction over the years, is another major contributor of facial wrinkles. Continuous muscle movement causes ‘dynamic wrinkles’ which only appear when the muscle is used, however, over time, if untreated, these wrinkles can become ‘static wrinkles’ which means they become permanently etched in our skin.

Thiner less elastic Skin:

Collagen is the supportive protein structure of our skin. It helps give skin it’s youthful plumpness. Skin stays more supple when there is enough progesterone …..which helps stimulate the production of collagen.

Sun Damage:

The maintenance of Melanocytes (cells that manufacture the pigment Melanin) is under the control of estrogens. As we move closer to menopause, the number of melanocytes in the skin is reduced. With less melanocytes, we produce less of the protective melanin and skin appears lighter. Our skin is therefore more prone to sun damage.

Pigmentation:

As estrogen helps regulate the production of melanin (pigment), melanin synthesis can increase (when estrogen decreases). This can then lead to brown “age spots”. These can appear on the face, hands, neck, arms and chest of many women. This is particularly evident in areas of our skin that have been exposed to the sun over the years. See here for more info on pigmentation and melasma.

Dry and sometimes itchy skin

Estrogen stimulates the production of oils in our skin and also our skins ability to hold moisture. So when estrogen production diminishes  – dry and sometimes itchy skin becomes common.

However it’s not all bad news, there it’s lots we can do which helps dramatically. If you haven’t yet whipped your anti-aging routine into shape, now’s the time—because it only gets harder from here.

What can help?

  • A healthier diet – a healthy outside starts on the inside.
  • Skip long hot showers which drys our Skin out.
  • Supplements – such as Zinc (can do wonders for Skin), probiotics (as gut health is linked to Skin health), Omega 3’s which help with inflammation and dryness, Vitex, Sage, black cohosh etc. Speak to a naturopath.
  • Sun protection +++
  • read previous Gut Article!!
  • See previous Adult Acne Article!!
  • Retinol (Vitamin A) based night serums – is anti-aging as it helps with collagen building and the rate at which skin cells generate. Amp up your results even further by using a dermal-roller prior.
  • Going to bed earlier – as lack of sleep can add to hormonal imbalance, inflammatory skin conditions and adult acne.  Aim for 7-9 hours per night.
  • Manage stress – as cortisol can trigger skin conditions such as psoriasis, rosacea and acne. Stress also robs us of progesterone.
  • Exercise – helps with circulation (blood flow to your skin) and also stress management. See previous article.
  • Quit smoking as it has been linked to early menopause.
  • Some people choose to get mustcle relaxant injections – these work to prevent the formation of static wrinkles by stopping the signal between the nerve and muscle. The decreased movement in the muscle places less stress on the skin helping to give a fresh and youthful appearance. Anti-wrinkle injections are made from a purified protein that temporarily causes facial muscles to relax, instantly softening lines and wrinkles and reducing the severity of visible wrinkles. Please contact Victoria for more information on Laser Clinics Australia bookings. Or visit the  LCA website
  • Hyaluronic dermal filler injections – once again, this is a personal choice made by some people. A dermal filler helps re-volumise and hydrate the face. Made from hyaluronic gel – a natural sugar already present in the human body. Hyaluronic can help restore fullness and volume in numerous facial areas. Visit here for more details.
  • See the Beauty Booster Treatment
  • Upgrade your Skincare Regime / Products – to suit your changing skin conditions. Visit the Solution Tool for further advice regarding which skincare products will best suit your individual skin concerns. 
  • Skin Treatments….eg Skin Needling
  • See ‘5 Of The Worst Things You Can do For Your Skin’
  • Progesterone Cream helps a lot of women with Perimenopausal symptoms in general. I highly recommend Ona’s Natural Progesterone Cream
  • To receive a discount on Ona’s natural progesterone cream use code : Vskin10
  • Vitex – has been traditionally used in Western herbal medicine for menstrual cycle irregularities and to help relieve symptoms associated with PMS. It can also provide symptomatic relief of hormone-induced acne. Visit your local health food shop or nutritionist for more information.

 

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology) ☺️

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Are Your Skincare Products Eco Friendly?

Enspired by recent Earth Day! 🌏 

Unfortunately not all Skincare products are kind to the environment!

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Testing on animals?

Cruelty free skincare

Many people are surprised to learn that so many of the big name skincare and cosmetic companies test on animals. The good news is that there are some great great companies out there such as Rodan + Fields that are 100% cruelty free.

To find out more about which companies DO test on animals please visit:-

https://www.crueltyfreekitty.com/companies-that-test-on-animals/

The bad list includes….

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Microbeads and our Marine Life

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In bays and estuaries all around the world (including Sydney), there are billions of particles of toxic plastic called microbeads. Sadly these microbeads are killing our fragile marine life!

Unfortunately microbeads are a common ingredient in cosmetic and household products. This includes some facial exfoliators, scrubs and polishes.

These microbeads are incredibly small. So small, in fact, that most wastewater treatment facilities can’t filter them out. The only way to stop microbeads from poisoning our rivers, lakes and oceans is to stop them entering delicate marine ecosystems in the first place.

Microbeads = toxic sponges

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Microbeads function like miniature sponges, absorbing things like pesticide and other chemical runoff. In fact they are often a million times more toxic than the water they’re floating in 😫

Marine worms in our oceans ingest these toxic microbeads. The worms are then eaten by fish and other predators. Then if people then eat those poisoned fish, well… you guessed it, they’re at serious risk of falling ill from the toxic residue too.

To find out more about the devastating effect microbeads have on our marine life please visit:-

http://animalsaustralia.org/features/plastic-microbeads-poisoning-marine-life.php

🐠 Rodan + Fields Microdermabrasion Paste does NOT have these non-biodegradable beads in them. Their product uses sugar and salt to polish and exfoliate the skin (helping to get rid of dead skin cells).

Other positive facts about R+F skincare company 

🌏 The vegetable gel capsules from the Redefine Intensive Renewing Serum and the Redefine Lip Renewing Serum all start to disintegrate when they come in contact with water.

🌏 All the products come in recyclable containers and clearly state on them, “Please recycle.”

🌏 The company aims to empower all women…. even   Mother Nature

🏅 They just received the award (for the 2nd year in a row) of #1 skincare line in ALL of North America!! The  numbers and awards speak for themselves 🥇

If you’re at all curious send me a message, happy to share some info 😊

Victoria Isherwood (Registered Nurse / Dermatology)